Discussion of spiritual practices: awakening, meditation, and the freedom that cannot be lost or found. All perspectives are welcome; advaita, christian, buddhist, islam or even no perspective at all. Just pointing to that which is nearest and dearest.


For some "awakening hints" take a peek at: www.robertflegal.com



Friday, April 27, 2012

remembering Peace


meditation is that practice of turning our attention from that which comes and goes (our thoughts) to that which is eternal (The Divine).

When we forget ourselves we remember Peace … regular practice is the key,
bob

Thursday, April 19, 2012

becoming comfortable with discomfort

When we begin meditation practice we are hoping for relaxation, peace, and perhaps even a blissful experience. It often does not work out that way!

The 'best' practice is when we are welcoming whatever is happening around us … noisy mind, noises in the room, rude friends who are practicing with us, a leg that won't stop aching, a goat running through the meditation hall … whatever.

Meditation can be thought of as becoming comfortable with discomfort. Life is often full of discomfort … anyone knows this. If, in our meditation practice, we learn to welcome discomfort we have a chance to do that in our 'ordinary life' as well. This, I believe, is a good thing.

give it a try: welcome everything during practice,
bob

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

best practice

We make 'spiritual practice' unnecessarily complicated. We have, teachings, levels of attainment, gurus, special practices, diets … the list goes on and on.

We can learn from the Buddha. After trying everything else he just sat under a tree in silence. Just sitting is silence is enough … it was enough for the Buddha; why do we need so much more?

think about it ... or even better give it a try,
bob

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

effortless uncovering

Meditation uncovers our obsession with the past and the future, as well as our lack of control over anything. This uncovering leads to the pristine state … vast, timeless, and peaceful. The pristine state cannot found through effort - when we stop efforting, we see that the unblemished state within is always there.

The key to real peace is regular practice. As we are in regular practice all the time anyway (mostly practicing being miserable), we might as well practice in a way that leads to uncovering the pristine state.
why not,

bob